More than one way to skin a cat

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Swedish Comics Association promotes Swedish comics and comic artists and organises exhibitions and prizes and such events, as well as comics education. I was very pleased when the multi-talented Lisa Scott, the project manager of the association, asked me to run three workshops for children in their bookshop and exhibition space Rum för Serier.

The workshop was aimed at children aged 7 to 10 and ran consecutively for three days during the October holiday week in 2017.

You never quite know how these things are going to pan out, until you actually get started. It was a small group, never more than nine young comic artists, all girls apart from one lone lad.  Bebopalula, were they focused – at the door 15 minutes early, brandishing sharped pencils. And they knew their stuff too.

We drew. A lot.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Feelings

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The story of the tree monster

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Some worked in black and white

Some worked with colour

Some worked with colour

Over the three days, we tried out several drawing and storytelling exercises, including getting up and stretching, to prevent that “frozen at my desk” feeling. We did some figure drawing.

Drawing with model

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We told a lot of stories – in words and pictures –  and we could have gone on for weeks.

At the Hamburg Comic Festival from 5th to 8th October 2017, I attended a great talk by Jillian Tamaki where she commented “there’s more than one way to skin a cat” with regard to making comics. And it’s true. There are no comic police (except in your own head). You have to find your own way to draw comics. And – no great surprise – you learn that by drawing comics. Which my young comics artists reminded me – and then some.

 

skinned-cat-online